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20100907
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we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> in the past couple of decades, internet use has spread across the planet, invading every aspect of life. in countries like south korea, going online seems to have become a necessity. >> [speaking korean] >> usually, i go online as soon as i wake up. on average, i use the internet for about 6 hours a day. >> in a unique experiment, the bbc has removed internet access from 2 families for a week, in this the most wired nation on earth. >> in other parts of the world, the digital superhighway still hasn't reached its destination. how many people here actually know what the internet is? [indistinct chattering] >> internet? anybody? now, though, we're going to be providing internet access to this village in northern nigeria. so, what happens when we turn the internet on here? >> and off here? [indistinct chattering] >> it's not exactly the information superhighway. [bleating] welcome to the village of gitata, 2 1/2 hours north of the nigerian capital abuja. what strikes you as you arrive in gitata is the fact that it seems so disconnected from
>> rose: welcome to our program. tonight, stephanie d'alessandro and john elderfield take us on a tour of a new matisse exhibit at the museum of modern art. >> it's a period when matisse really seemed to have very intently stopped the kind of work he was doing before and began searching for something and we can chart him through the evolution of "bathers by a river" in fact and then i think through "the exhibition" trying different modes of painting. bringing together different styles, avant-garde styles of the time, ways of making the surface of works very different and reworked. and we watch him not sure where he's going but excited about the possibility of a new kind of art for himself and we feel that for matisse that was a kind of radical invention. he said about "bathers by a river" and "moroccans" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical invention is about. >> i
, and thanks for joining us. too little too late. susie, that's the initial reaction from some business leaders to president obama's latest proposal to give tax breaks for businesses. >> susie: tom, the president will detail the plan tomorrow in cleveland. he's proposing that companies write off 100% of their investments in plants and equipment through next year. >> tom: the administration estimates the plan would cut business taxes by about $200 billion over the next two years. for some businesses, this "expensing" proposal could amount to a half-off sale on new equipment. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: you've probably heard about all those businesses sitting on their money, waiting for things to get better. the president's expensing plan could give executives an incentive to make a big purchase, says small business advocate todd mccracken. >> and what that does is it uses up a lot of extra cash that especially a lot of big companies seem to have right now bur that they're not using, they're not investing. and that has the potential to create jobs. >> reporter: but business groups are luke
to get their agenda through. they said don't run away from us yet. we're eight weeks away from election day. you see a lot of democrats in very tough districts really starting to put distance between themselves and the national democrats, president obama, speaker pelosi. >> lehrer: you also believe looking further at those polls about dissatisfaction with government. there's stuff in there that needs to be noted as well, correct some. >> awe-i have looked all year long. it's this volatility, almost anger that exists inside the electorate. take a look at these numbers because this is fascinating when you look at it through history. today 78% of respondents say tler dissatisfied or angry with government and how government works versus 22% who are satisfied or enthusiastic. compare that, jim, to november 1994. you remember bill clinton was president. newt gingrich, the republican revolution and the takeover of the house of representatives, you are seeing more dissatisfaction and anger in the electorate now than you did when republicans won 54 seats and took over the house. >> lehrer: now t
you could join us. >> all i know is his name is james. he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference. >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley with every question and answer. nationwide is proud to join tavis in working with literacy. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: eight weeks from tomorrow, americans are l head to the polls in all 50 states in an election that could alter the balance of power in the house and senate and have an impact on the presidential campaign come 2012. i'm joined now by susan page, washington bureau chief of "u.s.a. today". she joins us tonight where where else, d.c. good to have you on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: fair or not fair to suggest this is one of the most closely watched midterms in a long time. >> it reminds me of 1994, clinton's midterm. there are some parallels which i know is a concern with the democr
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5